USA Football
Football Cleats
Posted Apr 25, 2014

The rule regarding the use of screw on cleats has been eliminated by the Cape Ann Youth Football League. You can purchase any cleat that you feel is good for your child.


 
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Winter Football
Posted Sep 18, 2014

Hello winter football parents,

It is time to get our head count together for winter football. I am hoping we have a team in each division, but that will require 16 kids per level (3rd/4th, 5th/6th and 7th/8th to make that happen). The league is also opening registration for 9th/10th level, too, if you know someone interested there.

You are allowed to play up a level if we don't get the numbers, but there are no weight restrictions in winter indoor football, so there might be some danger involved with putting your player out there on game day. I am anticipating you folks returning and counting on you for recruiting talented new kids for us as well.

Anyone you know that might be interested has to email me directly at Emack7@aol.com. A flier is attached. Pass it around ASAP.
Please respond as soon as you can if you know you are in. There is no money being collected yet, but we might be doing this through Winthrop Youth Football and making the registration fee $250 to eliminate or limit fundraising responsibilities. That was a pain in the ars.
http://nhsportsplex.com/flag-football/YouthTackleFootball.html

It is 8on8 tackle football played on field turf in Bedford, NH, a one-hour drive. The parents enjoyed spending some nights after games are nearby hotels. It was a good time for the parents, too, especially since the facility serves alcohol for adults (haha).

Practice will be twice a week, Tuesday-Thursday 3:30-5 p.m. at Teamworks Revere indoor facility and/or perhaps a Winthrop gym time to time. We probably should give up on expecting temperatures to be warm and dry enough to get any outdoors time. The preseason practices start in early December and the season starts Jan. 3 and runs through early to mid-March, depending how deep we advance to the playoffs. We should be final four contenders again.

Let me know and please pass this on to anyone you know that might be interested, particularly you coaches CC'd above. Thank you,
Coach Mack


 
Nightmare Sports Parent
Posted Sep 22, 2013

• Overemphasizing sports at the expense of sportsmanship: The best athletes keep their emotions in check and perform at an even keel, win or lose. Parents demonstrative in showing displeasure during a contest are sending the wrong message. Encouragement is crucial -- especially when things aren’t going well on the field.

 • Having different goals than your child: Brown and Miller suggest jotting down a list of what you want for your child during their sport season. Your son or daughter can do the same. Vastly different lists are a red flag. Kids generally want to have fun, enjoy time with their friends, improve their skills and win. Parents who write down “getting a scholarship” or “making the All-Star team” probably need to adjust their goals. “Athletes say their parents believe their role on the team is larger than what the athlete knows it to be,” Miller says.

• Treating your child differently after a loss than a win: Almost all parents love their children the same regardless of the outcome of a game. Yet often their behavior conveys something else. "Many young athletes indicate that conversations with their parents after a game somehow make them feel as if their value as a person was tied to playing time or winning,” Brown says.

• Undermining the coach: Young athletes need a single instructional voice during games. That voice has to be the coach. Kids who listen to their parents yelling instruction from the stands or even glancing at their parents for approval from the field are distracted and can't perform at a peak level. Second-guessing the coach on the ride home is just as insidious.

• Living your own athletic dream through your child: A sure sign is the parent taking credit when the child has done well. “We worked on that shot for weeks in the driveway,” or “You did it just like I showed you” Another symptom is when the outcome of a game means more to a parent than to the child. If you as a parent are still depressed by a loss when the child is already off playing with friends, remind yourself that it’s not your career and you have zero control over the outcome.

Read more...

 
Pictures for Website Photo Album

If anyone has pictures that they would like placed in the photo album please email them to me at: caggianofuneralhome@hotmail.com

 
Ideal Sports Parent
Posted Sep 22, 2013

FIVE SIGNS OF AN IDEAL SPORTS PARENT

Let’s hear it for the parents who do it right. In many respects, Brown and Miller say, it’s easier to be an ideal sports parent than a nightmare. “It takes less effort,” Miller says. “Sit back and enjoy.” Here’s what to do:

• Cheer everybody on the team, not just your child: Parents should attend as many games as possible and be supportive, yet allow young athletes to find their own solutions. Don’t feel the need to come to their rescue at every crisis. Continue to make positive comments even when the team is struggling.

 • Model appropriate behavior: Contrary to the old saying, children do as you do, not as you say. When a parent projects poise, control and confidence, the young athlete is likely to do the same. And when a parent doesn’t dwell on a tough loss, the young athlete will be enormously appreciative.

• Know what is suitable to discuss with the coach: The mental and physical treatment of your child is absolutely appropriate. So is seeking advice on ways to help your child improve. And if you are concerned about your child’s behavior in the team setting, bring that up with the coach. Taboo topics: Playing time, team strategy, and discussing team members other than your child.

• Know your role: Everyone at a game is either a player, a coach, an official or a spectator. “It’s wise to choose only one of those roles at a time,” Brown says. “Some adults have the false impression that by being in a crowd, they become anonymous. People behaving poorly cannot hide.” Here’s a clue: If your child seems embarrassed by you, clean up your act.

• Be a good listener and a great encourager: When your child is ready to talk about a game or has a question about the sport, be all ears. Then provide answers while being mindful of avoiding becoming a nightmare sports parent. Above all, be positive. Be your child's biggest fan. "Good athletes learn better when they seek their own answers," Brown says.

And, of course, don’t be sparing with those magic words: "I love watching you play."

Read more...

 
Photo Album
 
7 ways to ruin sports for your kids!! By: Victor Medina
Posted Aug 4, 2011

 

 

 

 There's something about youth sports that turns some parents into maniacs. From the obnoxious heckler to the angry dad who punches a referee because he didn't like the call, some adults can't help but throw reason - and sportsmanship - out the window.

 

1. Set a Bad Example

 

Screaming at your TV during Sunday NFL games is one thing. Screaming the wrong thing at your kid's football game could get you kicked out of the booster club. While you try to do the right things, avoid doing any of the following:

 

2. Be Smarter than the Ump 

 

When a call is blown, it's easy to give the umpire or referee an earful. However, doing so only undermines their authority, and that is a dangerous signal to send to a child. Instead, encourage a player to "shake off" what happened without focusing on the call. It will also help keep the athlete focused on their play instead of fuming that they have been slighted.

 

 3. Work the Sidelines

It's tempting, especially as the father of a young athlete, to stand on the sidelines and encourage the players. No matter what the sport or the age, most coaches find such behavior annoying and distracting. Young children in particular will spend most of their time looking at you rather than playing the game.

4. Pick on the Weak Ones

Taunting an opposing player has been elevated to an art form at the pro level, but for children, it is not constructive. Mocking or chanting at opposing players is classless; consider how you would feel if it were your child. Such behavior teaches impressionable minds to trash talk, and there's way too much of that in sports already. In addition, it encourages other fans to do so, which could easily escalate into a mob mentality with parents yelling at one another, or worse.

5. Just Win, Baby

Losing can be a difficult thing for kids, especially youngsters playing in their first organized sport. Your reaction as a father will dictate how your child approaches failure, and it can teach them a lesson they carry with them all of their lives. Make it clear to them that there is no shame in losing if they give it their full effort. Some may argue that scores shouldn't be kept in games for young children, but it robs a child of learning that not everyone wins. Sometimes you win because you are bigger, stronger or smarter. Losing can give a child the motivation to be exceptional. Remember, Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team. The experience taught him to practice harder and longer than everyone else, and it paid off. It's a lesson too many children today do not learn.

6. Forget the Team

Sometimes a parent trying to build a better athlete loses sight of what is important. Win or lose, take time after each game to bond with your child. Talk about the game and their performance, but also ask them for their thoughts. Get them to open up about how they felt about the game. It can build self-esteem and teach them how to discuss things in a mature manner.

7. Be a Sore Loser

If you want to see how parents can get it right, consider the true tale of the Gainesville State School Tornadoes football team. Made up of incarcerated Texas high schoolers who serve their time at the school's prison facility, the team has to travel across the state to find private schools that will play them. With little money and resources, the Tornadoes wear old, simple uniforms and don't win many games. Parents of the players rarely attend games; most don't even visit them in prison. When Gainesville played Grapevine Faith Academy, however, Faith coach Kris Hogan arranged for half of his fans to cheer for the Tornadoes. He had heard about these kids with no support and no hope and decided to do something about it. Not only did the parents of Faith players cheer for the Tornadoes players on their side of the field, but also after the game, the parents fed them, congratulated them (even though they lost) and gave them a Bible and a handwritten letter of encouragement. The story even gained national attention when it was featured on ESPN. Sometimes, mutual respect and a love of the game are just as fulfilling as winning.


 
Youth Sports Concussion Program
 
Parent Code of Conduct
Posted Aug 5, 2011

Preamble:
Interscholastic and youth sports programs play an important role in promoting the physical, social and emotional development of children. It is therefore essential for parents, coaches and officials to encourage youth athletes to embrace the values of good sportsmanship. Moreover, adults involved in youth sports events should be models of good sportsmanship and should lead by example by demonstrating fairness, respect and self control.

I therefore pledge to be responsible for my words and actions while attending, coaching, officiating or participating in a youth sports event and shall conform my behavior to the following code of conduct:

  1. I will not engage in unsportsmanlike conduct with any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  2. I will not encourage my child, or any other person, to engage in unsportsmanlike conduct with any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  3. I will not engage in any behavior which would endanger the health, safety or well being of any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  4. I will not encourage my child, or any other person, to engage in any behavior which would endanger the health, safety or well being of any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  5. I will not use drugs or alcohol while at a youth sports event and will not attend, coach, officiate or participate in a youth sports event while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  6. I will not permit my child, or encourage any other person, to use drugs or alcohol at a youth sports event and will not permit my child, or encourage any other person, to attend, coach, officiate or participate in a youth sports event while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  7. I will not engage in the use of profanity.
  8. I will not encourage my child, or any other person, to engage in the use of profanity.
  9. I will treat any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee with respect regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation or ability.
  10. I will encourage my child to treat any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee with respect regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation or ability.
  11. will not engage in verbal or physical threats or abuse aimed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  12. I will not encourage my child, or any other person, to engage in verbal or physical threats or abuse aimed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  13. I will not initiate a fight or scuffle with any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.
  14. I will not encourage my child, or any other person, to initiate a fight or scuffle with any coach, parent, player, participant, official or any other attendee.

 
General Guidelines for Fluid Needs During Exercise
Posted Aug 5, 2011

General Guidelines for Fluid Needs During Exercise

While specific fluid recommendations aren't possible due to individual variability, most athletes can use the following guidelines as a starting point, and modify their fluid needs accordingly.

Hydration Before Exercise

  • Drink about 15-20 fl oz, 2-3 hours before exercise
  • Drink 8-10 fl oz 10-15 min before exercise

Hydration During Exercise

  • Drink 8-10 fl oz every 10-15 min during exercise
  • If exercising longer than 90 minutes, drink 8-10 fl oz of a sports drink (with no more than 8 percent carbohydrate) every 15 - 30 minutes.

Hydration After Exercise

  • Weigh yourself before and after exercise and replace fluid losses.
  • Drink 20-24 fl oz water for every 1 lb lost.
  • Consume a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein within the 2 hours after exercise to replenish glycogen stores.

Read more...


 

Week 4 schedule
Posted Aug 23, 2014

A Team vs Masco @ WHS 5:00 PM

C Team vs Masco @ WHS 3:30 PM

JVC Gold vs Masco 1 @ WHS 2:00 PM 

JVC Blue vs Masco 2 @ WHS  12:30 PM

D Team vs Marblehead 3 @ WHS  11:00 AM

All games are at home...


 
Equipment
Posted Aug 2, 2013

Equipment that is need for the upcoming season:

1. Mouthpiece that attaches to mask.

2. Football Cleats

3. White intergrated practice pants

4. Navy Blue socks (game only)

 


 
Cheerleading
Posted Apr 26, 2013

For any questions regarding cheerleading please contact:

Lisa Mignosa

617 688 7374


 
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